Friday, October 12, 2018

WEBINAR Exploring Evidence-Based Legal and Policy Strategies to Prevent Fatal Injuries and Violence


Join us on Wednesday, October 31 at 1:00 p.m. ET to learn about evidence-based legal and policy strategies that can be leveraged to address Healthy People 2020 objectives, including the Leading Health Indicators (LHI). This webinar will focus on the 2 Injury and Violence LHIs — reducing injury deaths and reducing homicides. Presenters will highlight legal research and other policy-related resources that can provide decision-makers and public health professionals with the necessary tools and information to identify and implement laws, policies, and programs to improve population health in their own communities. You’ll also hear about how communities can address these issues by leveraging evidence-based law and policy solutions to address injury and violence prevention goals.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Americans Believe Suicide Can Be Prevented: Results of the New Harris Poll

As part of National Suicide Prevention Week, and in partnership with the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, we’ve sponsored a new national survey conducted online by The Harris Poll to discover the general public’s latest perceptions on mental health and suicide, updating a similar survey from 2015.

According to the results, Americans overwhelmingly (94 percent) believe that suicide can be prevented, and most (94 percent) would take action to help someone close to them who was thinking about suicide.
Read more about the survey's findings

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

FUNDING Sexual Violence Prevention RFA

The new Sexual Violence Prevention Program’s RFA (Creating Supportive Environments) has been released!

Background:

The Sexual Violence Prevention (SVP) Program is pleased to announce the availability of funds to enhance community-level primary prevention across Colorado in an effort to address root causes of sexual violence.

The SVP Program recognizes that there are important shared upstream factors that increase or decrease the likelihood of sexual violence perpetration and multiple other forms of violence such as: weak health, educational, and social policies/laws; diminished economic opportunities/high unemployment rates; community support/connectedness (Connecting the Dots). By funding strategies to impact these upstream factors and modifying characteristics of the community, we can influence healthy social, economic, and environmental conditions that have a sustainable impact for all communities.

This funding opportunity will support this work across two critical focus areas: Creating Protective Environments and Providing Opportunities to Empower and Support Girls and Women.

Due Date: November 16, 2018 at 5pm MT

To Access the RFA Package: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/svp

Thursday, October 4, 2018

EVENT Positive Youth Development Training in Lowry October 30


Positive Youth Development, “PYD” is an approach that incorporates the development of skills, opportunities and authentic relationships into programs, practices and policies, so that young people reach their full potential. This training is open to youth serving professionals or anyone interested in youth well-being or development. This FREE training will link content with expertise! 

Monday, October 1, 2018

WEBINAR Triple P: An Evidence-Based System to Prevent Child Maltreatment


Please join us for an upcoming Virtual Learning Session on the Triple P program hosted by the Child Maltreatment Prevention National Peer Learning Team. Free and open to all but pre-registration is required. 

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

JOB OPPORTUNITY Communities that Care

Communities that Care (CTC) Coordinator description image
 
Boulder County Public Health is hiring a Communities that Care Facilitator. Communities That Care (CTC) emphasizes a strengths-based approach to increase protective factors for children, youth, and young adults by promoting principles of healthy youth development, improving youth outcomes, reducing problem behaviors, and supporting communities and youth-serving agencies through coordination of a community-based CTC process. The ultimate goal is to select and implement evidence-based public health strategies, including policy, communications, and system change.

This position recruits and supports a community board and workgroups to understand the CTC process and complete "CTC Milestones & Benchmarks" (i.e. supports the work, but the responsibility rests with the board for completing the CTC process). The position guides community CTC efforts and the CTC project, which is supported by a grant from the State of Colorado. Funding is provided on an annual basis, although the current grant cycle is expected to continue through June 30, 2021. The CTC project focuses on the Lafayette community, and the position works closely with an East Boulder community organization and contracted health planner to implement CTC processes to support and guide the community in generating local responses and solutions to reduce substance abuse.
 
The position is backed by extensive training and technical assistance from the Center for CTC and BCPH. CTC is housed in BCPH's Community Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) Program, which is part of the Community Health Division.

This is a full-time, benefited term position with Boulder County, with an anticipated end date of June 30, 2021. The Communities that Care Facilitator will work Monday through Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm out of the Public Health office in Boulder, CO. Applicants must be available and willing to work evenings and weekends, as well as travel locally and occasionally out of state. Under FLSA guidelines, this position is exempt from overtime. 

Hiring salary range: $3,881 to $4,736 per month
 
For more information and to apply, please click here.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Child Passenger Safety Week!

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Your online source for credible health information. 
Child Passenger Safety Week 2018
childPassengerSafetyWeek2018_300x158.png
In the United States, motor vehicle–related injuries are a leading cause of death among children. Always buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts reduces the risk of serious and fatal injuries by up to 80%.

This year’s Child Passenger Safety Week is the perfect time to raise awareness about the importance of always properly buckling children. CDC’s Injury Center has recently updated our resources and website to reflect the new child passenger safety guidelines from AAP and best practices. Make sure children are properly buckled up in a car seat, booster seat, or seat belt, whichever is appropriate for their weight, height, and age.

Know the stages:
  • Rear-facing car seat: Birth until age 2-4.
For the best possible protection, infants and toddlers should be buckled in a rear-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limits of their seat. Check the seat’s owner’s manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits.
  • Forward-facing car seat: After outgrowing rear-facing seat until at least age 5.
When children outgrow their rear-facing seats, they should be buckled in a forward-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of their seat. Check the seat’s owner’s manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits.
  • Booster seat: After outgrowing forward-facing seat and until seat belts fit properly.
Once children outgrow their forward-facing seat, they should be buckled in a belt positioning booster seat until seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lays across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and age 9-12 years.
  • Seat Belt: Once seat belts fit properly without a booster seat.
Children no longer need to use a booster seat once seat belts fit them properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lays across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and age 9-12 years. For the best possible protection, keep children properly buckled in the back seat.

Join Child Passenger Safety Week 2018
The CDC has reached over 2 million subscribers. Thank you for your support.
Questions or problems? Please contact support@govdelivery.com.
Dept of Health and Human Services Logo  CDC 24/7 - Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. CDC.gov/24-7
CDC on Facebook   CDC on Twitter   CDC YouTube Channel  CDC Instagram   CDC Pinterest
CDC Vital Signs™ – Learn about the latest public health data. Read CDC Vital Signs™