Friday, September 20, 2019

Call for Applications RWJF Health Policy Fellows

Every day, health professionals see firsthand the real-world consequences of how policies set by federal lawmakers affect the health of everyone in America. RWJF’s Health Policy Fellows program is seeking mid-career professionals from diverse backgrounds such as medicine, research, and academia who want to understand and help influence the policy-making process in Washington, D.C. Selected applicants will spend 12 months in Washington, D.C. working in the legislative and executive branches actively helping shape policy, attending professional development sessions, and networking.

Purpose

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health Policy Fellows program provides the nation’s most comprehensive learning experience at the nexus of health, science, and policy in Washington, D.C. It is an outstanding opportunity for exceptional midcareer health professionals and behavioral/social scientists with an interest in health and health care policy. Fellows participate in the policy process at the federal level and use that leadership experience to improve health, health care, and health policy.

Key Dates

September 24, 2019 (11 a.m. ET) and October 24, 2019 (2 p.m. ET)
Optional applicant web conference calls. Registration is required. Please visit the program’s website for complete details and to register.

November 4, 2019 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of three reference letters.

November 6, 2019 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of preliminary applications

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

It's Child Passenger Safety Week

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Your online source for credible health information. 

It's Child Passenger Safety Week!

Graphic showing a baby in a rear facing car seat that reads
Child Passenger Safety Week starts today! Celebrate with us and help raise awareness about buckling children in age- and size- appropriate car seats, booster seats, or seat belts. This is a great week to learn how to:
  • buckle kids correctly,
  • identify and understand the car seat stages, and
  • avoid the common mistakes when using car seats, booster seats, and seat belts.

What you need to know:

  • Rear-facing car seat: Birth until age 2–4.
For the best possible protection, infants and toddlers should be properly buckled in a rear-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limits of their seat. Check the seat owner's manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits.
  • Forward-facing car seat: After outgrowing rear-facing seat and until at least age 5.
When children outgrow their rear-facing seats, they should be properly buckled in a forward-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of their seat. Check the seat owner's manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits. 
  • Booster seat: After outgrowing forward-facing seat and until seat belts fit properly.
Once children outgrow their forward-facing seat, they should be properly buckled in a belt positioning booster seat, in the back seat, until seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lays across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and aged 9–12.
  • Seat Belt: Once seat belts fit properly without a booster seat.
Children no longer need to use a booster seat once seat belts fit properly. Seats belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lays across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and aged 9–12.

Remember, always properly buckle children age 12 years and younger in the back seat!

To learn more about child passenger safety, please visit: www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/child_passenger_safety.


Top Tips to Keep Kids Safe

Is Your Car Seat Installed Correctly?
Our Ultimate Car Seat Guide Can Help
Learn More

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

2018 BRFSS Public Data Set Now Available!


Attention, Researchers: 2018 BRFSS Public Data Set Now Available!

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s
Division of Population Health
Announces the Release of
The 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data Set
The BRFSS is a unique, state-based surveillance system active in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Reaching participants on both landline and cellular telephones, the survey collects information on health risk behaviors, clinical preventive health practices, and health care access (primarily related to chronic disease and injury) from a representative sample of noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 years or older in each state. The BRFSS provides flexible, timely, and ongoing data collection that allows for state-to-state and state-to-nation comparisons. State-specific data—including racial- and ethnic-specific data from the BRFSS—provide a sound basis for developing and evaluating public health programs, including programs targeted to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in addressing health risks.

The BRFSS is the largest ongoing telephone-based health surveillance system in the world, with more than 435,000 interviews conducted in 2018. BRFSS staff are working to make this new data set available soon through its online Prevalence and Trends Tools.  
Learn more about the BRFSS Prevalence and Trends Tools.
Learn more about the BRFSS or send an inquiry to CDCINFO@cdc.gov


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Monday, September 16, 2019

WEBINAR Strengthening Tribal Public Health Partnerships

Northwest Center for Public Health
                              Practice, University of Washington
School of Public Health
Hot Topics in Practice
Strengthening Tribal Public Health Partnerships
Monday, September 23, 2019
Noon to 1 p.m. PT
Register
Tribal community members work hard to protect and promote the health of their people. In the September session of Hot Topics in Practice, Tamara Fulwyler shares how non-tribal public health agencies can better collaborate with tribal entities to support these efforts.
This one-hour webinar will provide a brief overview of tribes in Washington, encouraging participants to understand how historical events shape the health of these communities today. It will also discuss important concepts like sovereignty and the process of consultation as important components for successful collaborations with tribal governments. The presentation will close with a review of resources for government-to-government relationship building, including NWCPHP’s new online toolkit.
Register today to better understand the benefits of effective collaborations between state, local and tribal public health agencies.
IMPORTANT NOTES ABOUT HOT TOPICS
Speaker slides are posted on our website the morning of the webinar. Each session is recorded and made available by the next day. Audio is available through computer or by phone.
Hot Topics in Practice is a monthly webinar hosted by the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Guest speakers from local, state, tribal, and national organizations present on current issues affecting public health practice.
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© 2019 Northwest Center for Public Health Practice
4333 Brooklyn Ave NE, T-14, Seattle, WA 98105

Thursday, September 12, 2019

It’s National Suicide Prevention Month

It's National Suicide Prevention Week!
Check out the toolkit
The Model School Policy on Suicide Prevention has been newly updated
Learn more
This year AFSP awarded 26 new grants totaling over $6.2 million
Learn more
Check out musicians Hayley Kiyoko, Aminé, Christina Peri and Lindsey Stirling in our new Seize the Awkward videos
Watch now
Dr. Christine Moutier and members of our Scientific Council to participate in The Joint Commission’s webinar on implementing new health system standards for preventing suicide, with a focus on the Safety Planning Intervention, on September 9
Register today
AFSP Supports 3-Digit Mental Health, Suicide Prevention Number
and Urges Continued Congressional Oversight
Learn more
Talkin’ Baseball: Having #RealConvos about mental health at the ballpark
Learn more
“Depression Tried to Take My Mom. She and My Dad Fought Back”
Learn more
Suicide prevention is making headlines
Read the highlights
Have a story you'd like us to share in the Hope Hub? Click here for submission guidelines and ways to submit.
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