Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Motor Vehicle Safety Fact Sheet

Research shows that primary seat belt laws are the most effective way to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries on public roadways. Updating Colorado’s current seat belt law would provide protection for all citizens. That's why it is a legislative recommendation submitted annually to the Colorado General Assembly by the Child Fatality Prevention System and the Colorado Task Force on Drunk and Impaired Driving; and is supported by the Colorado Young Drivers Alliance and the Colorado Occupant Protection Task Force.

Traffic safety advocates across the state are educating stakeholders on seat belt use and effective policies to prevent motor vehicle fatalities. To learn more about the communities at highest risk of being seriously injured or killed in an unrestrained motor vehicle crash, how Colorado currently addresses this issue, and to access additional traffic safety advocate resources, contact Ginna Jones, Motor Vehicle Safety Manager at ginna.jones@state.co.us.

Click the fact sheet below to download for educating stakeholders on motor vehicle safety best practices.




Monday, December 10, 2018

OPPORTUNITY The Healthy People 2030 public comment period is now open!


The opportunity for public comment on the Healthy People 2030 objectives is now open .  You are a group with much to offer! 




Healthy People focuses on critical health promotion and disease prevention topics. Since its launch in 1979, the initiative has grown substantially—increasing from 226 objectives in 15 topic areas for Healthy People 1990 to more than 1,200 objectives in 42 topic areas for Healthy People 2020. Because stakeholders have indicated a desire for a more specific and targeted initiative in the next decade, Healthy People 2030 will be a streamlined set of national health objectives guiding the Nation in efforts to improve health. While this translates to a smaller set of objectives, Heathy People 2030 will continue to represent critical public health priorities by addressing the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and driving action at the national, state, and local levels.

The Healthy People 2030 public comment period is now open! The public comment period will be open from December 3, 2018 through January 17, 2019. Review the proposed objectives, submit comments, or propose your own objective at https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/About-Healthy-People/Development-Healthy-People-2030/Public-Comment

Previous public comments on the proposed Healthy People 2030 framework helped shape the vision, mission, foundational principles, plan of action, and overarching goals for Healthy People 2030. In this public comment period, HHS would like input on the proposed Core, Developmental, and Research objectives.

In response to stakeholder input, Healthy People 2030 will include a streamlined set of national health objectives to guide the Nation’s  efforts to improve health. Healthy People 2030 will continue to represent critical public health priorities by addressing the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and driving action at the national, state, and local levels. 

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Safe Sleep Photo Gallery

Colorado’s Infant Safe Sleep Partnership is a statewide coalition working to promote infant safe sleep.
We are recruiting families to develop a photo gallery of caregivers with their infants in safe sleep settings.

The photos will be used to promote safe sleep education throughout the state to ensure all infants sleep safely,
every sleep. Your home could be a valuable resource to show other families what safe sleep looks like and keep all
babies safe. Parents and caregivers can take simple steps to reduce the dangers of unsafe sleep environments.

What is safe sleep?
Here are the safe sleep guidelines that we’d like to see for photos:

Ask:
Currently there are very few images of families practicing safe sleep. The photos are outdated and not representative
of what families actually look like in Colorado.

We are looking for families with infants under four months of age who are willing to allow a photographer to visit your
home to photograph you, your infant, and your safe sleeping environment (see above). Keep in mind, we want your
home to look like you live there, so no pressure to clean!

These photos may be used in a number of places, such as in Infant Safe Sleep Partnership materials, Child Fatality
Prevention System materials, and with other partners such as CDPHE, CDHS and other national partners working on safe sleep.


For more information or to participate, please contact:
Megan Stayton at megan.stayton@state.co.us or 303-692-6444.

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

WEBINAR The Intersection Between Housing and Health

Interdisciplinary Research Leaders
Housing—how it is built, renovated, and maintained—plays a vital role in supporting, or hindering, individual and community health and well-being.

Join The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Leadership for Better Health and Research, Evaluation and Learning (REL) programs for a webinar exploring the intersection between housing and health. You’ll hear the latest thinking from a variety of thought leaders who are looking at the issue of housing and health from different angles, and have an opportunity to ask questions.

Register Now
Thursday, December 13, 2018, 11 a.m. ET.

This link will also allow you to add the webinar to your calendar.

Adrianne Todman, CEO of the National Organization of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, will moderate a panel of program participants, including:
  • Steve Barlow, JD, MA, who, along with his teammates in the Interdisciplinary Research Leaders program, is exploring how housing code enforcement interventions in Memphis, Tennessee, can prevent decay of urban areas, and keep communities safe and healthy.
  • Omolara Uwemedimo, MD, MPH, who, along with her teammates in the Clinical Scholars program, is collaborating with a health system in New York City to incorporate questions about housing into patients’ regular health screenings.
  • Evidence for Action researcher Bruce Tonn, PhD, who has evaluated how low-income housing units weatherized with “Extreme Energy Makeovers” in Knoxville, Tennessee, have saved energy, reduced environmental impact, and improved residents’ health.
  • Systems for Action researcher Ricardo Basurto-D├ívila, PhD, MSc., who is studying, with his research partner, how providing permanent supportive housing impacts the health of people who have been homeless.
We hope you’ll join us on December 13, 2018, at 11 a.m. ET. Thank you!

Interdisciplinary Research Leaders
National Program Center
University of Minnesota School of Public Health
1300 South 2nd Street, Suite 300
Minneapolis, MN 55454
Phone: 844-210-9072
ResearchLeaders@umn.edu
interdisciplinaryresearch-leaders.org

Monday, December 3, 2018

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the U.S. Department of Transportation, with the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration remind you to celebrate safely this holiday season. We stand with all those who have known the tragic consequences of drugged or drunk driving, and we rededicate ourselves to preventing it this December and throughout the year.

President Obama has designated December 2012 as National Impaired Driving Prevention Month and invites families, educators, health care providers, and community leaders to promote responsible decision-making and encourage young people to live free of drugs and alcohol.

Why do we recognize National Impaired Driving Prevention Month?In an average year, 30 million Americans drive drunk, and 10 million Americans drive impaired by illicit drugs.

A 2010 survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) revealed that 13.2 percent of all people aged 16 or older drove under the influence of alcohol and 4.3 percent drove under the influence of illicit drugs during the past year.1


Furthermore, rates of impaired driving differed dramatically by age.1
  • While 11.8 percent of people aged 26 and older drove drunk, 19.5 percent of people aged 16 to 25 drove drunk.
  • And, 2.8 percent of the older group drove drugged, while 11.4 percent of younger drivers did so.1
December seems particularly suited to this observation because traffic fatalities that involve impaired drivers increase significantly during the Christmas and New Year’s holiday periods.2

  • On average, 25 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes per day during December 2010.
  • Young adults are among those at greatest risk for driving impaired. During December 2010, drivers 21 to 34 years old were alcohol impaired and involved in fatal crashes at a higher percentage than any other age group.
All 50 States and the District of Columbia enforce the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years. NHTSA asks minors to avoid alcohol, and encourages parents and other caregivers to make a new or renewed commitment to never cater a party to underage drinking. If someone you know is drinking, do not let that person get behind the wheel. If you see an impaired driver on the road, contact law enforcement. Your actions may save someone's life, and inaction could cost a life. Families play an essential part in stopping impaired driving. By talking about the risks and setting clear expectations, parents and other caregivers can help their children stay safe, sober, and focused on the road.

Prevention Resources and Toolkits:

Friday, November 30, 2018

Lend Your Voice! Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plan Survey


On behalf of the City & County of Denver, we are sharing a survey to all stakeholders who work in housing and community development, economic development, education, lending, social services, fair housing, and any other field directly or indirectly related to housing, social services, or economic development.

The City and County of Denver needs your help as they develop their five-year Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plan, a study required to obtain federal funds. By participating in this voluntary and confidential survey, you will help the City understand needs and to identify appropriate actions to improve housing and community development for all residents in Denver.
 
How can you help?
  1. Take the stakeholder survey! Just click here: https://www.research.net/r/DenverConPlan2018
  2. Spread the word! Forward this email and invite your colleagues to participate in the stakeholder survey.
If you need translation of the survey into a language other than English or a reasonable accommodation to take the survey, please contact Mehgie Tabar at mtabar@bbcresearch.com or 800-748-3222 ext. 230.

If you have questions about the Consolidated Plan process or this survey, please contact Rachel King with the Office of Economic Development by email at Rachel.King@denvergov.org.

________________________

~  Just a reminder  ~
The CCAP Collaborative will not be meeting again until January:
Thursday, January 24, 2019
from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

If you can't make it in person, you can join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/418758197 

Or dial in using your phone.
United States (Toll Free): 1 877 568 4106
United States: +1 (646) 749-3129

Access Code: 418-758-197 
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The Denver CCAP Collaborative, formerly the Denver Child Care Task Force, was founded to give Denver child care providers a voice in the community and an opportunity to meet and connect with the Denver Department of Human Services Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) staff.

Since the early 1990's, this group has convened to discuss policy and funding issues that affect large and small child care providers in the City and County of Denver. The group meets every other month and includes participants from large and small child care centers, community funders and representatives from the Denver Department of Human Services.